Road Safety Commission's Community Grants Portal

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Welcome to:


The Road Safety Community Grant Program supports the development and implementation of sustainable projects and one-off community activities that assist in promoting road safety across the state through the Road Trauma Trust Account (RTTA).


If you're already familiar with the application process, feel free to hop straight over to the 'apply' widget in the right hand panel, and click either submit event or project application.


If you're new to road safety grants - hello and welcome! Have a look at the grants snapshot below, what's involved in the application process, peruse the FAQs, and read through the grant guideline documents! Don't hesitate to get in touch if we can provide you with any assistance



Make sure you click 'Subscribe' (on the right hand side) to be notified of future grant rounds, important information and updates to the grants program.

Event and Project Grants can be applied for 3 to 12 months in advance of the planned event or project commencement date. Should you have questions, or would like to discuss your ideas, please email grants@rsc.wa.gov.au or visit the Road Safety Community Grants Portal.



Grant Stories: Community Event and Project Grants


Slowing Down Traffic

Erwin and his husband were looking for a chance to get out of the city, when they fell in love with Mullalyup in WA’s South West. But after moving there, they soon realised that the highway passing though the tiny town, presented some challenges.

Although part of the fabric of the community, bringing tourists and supporting local business, the constant volume of traffic and 70km speed limit made it noisy and dangerous.

It turned out that Erwin’s concerns were echoed by others in the Mullalyup community.

So inspired by the Safer Speeds & Better Places Community Toolkit, Erwin arranged for Town Team Movement representatives to come to Mullalyup to explore placemaking ideas with the community.

It was decided to create an entry statement to the town in the hope that it might encourage drivers to reduce their speed and take in the sights.

So with funding from the Road Safety Commission’s Community Grants Program, a stunning mural was created by artist Alicia Rogerson featuring the vulnerable Red Tailed Cockatoos in the area.

The mural (pictured) had a remarkable impact on road safety in the town. Prompting motorists to reduce their speed.

Furthermore, the road safety message conveyed in the mural “Slow Down in Our Town”, resonated with drivers, resulting in more respectful and safer driving.

Mullalyup is just one of many communities in Western Australia that have made their streets safer, thanks to the Road Safety Commission’s partnership with the Town Team Movement.

Photographs courtesy of Alicia Rogerson

The Safer Speeds and Better Places Community Toolkit is part of the Safer Speeds and Better Places program made possible thanks to a partnership between Town Team Movement and Road Safety Commission and will be delivered across a three-year period, 2023 – 2025.

Surfing WA developed a simple and easily understood message: No Txt No Wrecks, which aimed to change driver behaviour, help reduce the number of people being killed or seriously injured due to driver distraction and above all getting the community to their chosen surf spot safely.


Living with Emus Project

The Nannup town, has honoured the resilient Emu with a recent art installation of a 3m tall sculpture weighting approximately 650kg. With grant funding contributed by the Road Safety Commission, the Living with Emus project enabled the creation of a large emu sculpture from wrecked car parts.

The Shire of Narembeen - SOCK Week

SOCK stands for ‘Save Our Country Kids’ and is a road safety initiative created by the Narembeen CRC.

It is a week long campaign of education on road safety and the impact poor decision making can have within a small community. SOCK Week is held annually in the last week of June and facilitates a number of activities and events that are designed to be informative as well as engaging. Activities held during the week remember those community members who have been lost in road accidents, as well as raising awareness, promoting safe, legal and responsible road use across several road safety messages, and is aimed at a broad cross-section of the community.


Project grants are available for groups to submit an application to implement road safety projects. These projects can run up to 12 months and should comprise of road safety activities that can be sustained after the funding period. The amount funded is based on the assessment of the application and is judged on individual merit. There are two Project grant rounds per year.





Welcome to:


The Road Safety Community Grant Program supports the development and implementation of sustainable projects and one-off community activities that assist in promoting road safety across the state through the Road Trauma Trust Account (RTTA).


If you're already familiar with the application process, feel free to hop straight over to the 'apply' widget in the right hand panel, and click either submit event or project application.


If you're new to road safety grants - hello and welcome! Have a look at the grants snapshot below, what's involved in the application process, peruse the FAQs, and read through the grant guideline documents! Don't hesitate to get in touch if we can provide you with any assistance



Make sure you click 'Subscribe' (on the right hand side) to be notified of future grant rounds, important information and updates to the grants program.

Event and Project Grants can be applied for 3 to 12 months in advance of the planned event or project commencement date. Should you have questions, or would like to discuss your ideas, please email grants@rsc.wa.gov.au or visit the Road Safety Community Grants Portal.



Grant Stories: Community Event and Project Grants


Slowing Down Traffic

Erwin and his husband were looking for a chance to get out of the city, when they fell in love with Mullalyup in WA’s South West. But after moving there, they soon realised that the highway passing though the tiny town, presented some challenges.

Although part of the fabric of the community, bringing tourists and supporting local business, the constant volume of traffic and 70km speed limit made it noisy and dangerous.

It turned out that Erwin’s concerns were echoed by others in the Mullalyup community.

So inspired by the Safer Speeds & Better Places Community Toolkit, Erwin arranged for Town Team Movement representatives to come to Mullalyup to explore placemaking ideas with the community.

It was decided to create an entry statement to the town in the hope that it might encourage drivers to reduce their speed and take in the sights.

So with funding from the Road Safety Commission’s Community Grants Program, a stunning mural was created by artist Alicia Rogerson featuring the vulnerable Red Tailed Cockatoos in the area.

The mural (pictured) had a remarkable impact on road safety in the town. Prompting motorists to reduce their speed.

Furthermore, the road safety message conveyed in the mural “Slow Down in Our Town”, resonated with drivers, resulting in more respectful and safer driving.

Mullalyup is just one of many communities in Western Australia that have made their streets safer, thanks to the Road Safety Commission’s partnership with the Town Team Movement.

Photographs courtesy of Alicia Rogerson

The Safer Speeds and Better Places Community Toolkit is part of the Safer Speeds and Better Places program made possible thanks to a partnership between Town Team Movement and Road Safety Commission and will be delivered across a three-year period, 2023 – 2025.

Surfing WA developed a simple and easily understood message: No Txt No Wrecks, which aimed to change driver behaviour, help reduce the number of people being killed or seriously injured due to driver distraction and above all getting the community to their chosen surf spot safely.


Living with Emus Project

The Nannup town, has honoured the resilient Emu with a recent art installation of a 3m tall sculpture weighting approximately 650kg. With grant funding contributed by the Road Safety Commission, the Living with Emus project enabled the creation of a large emu sculpture from wrecked car parts.

The Shire of Narembeen - SOCK Week

SOCK stands for ‘Save Our Country Kids’ and is a road safety initiative created by the Narembeen CRC.

It is a week long campaign of education on road safety and the impact poor decision making can have within a small community. SOCK Week is held annually in the last week of June and facilitates a number of activities and events that are designed to be informative as well as engaging. Activities held during the week remember those community members who have been lost in road accidents, as well as raising awareness, promoting safe, legal and responsible road use across several road safety messages, and is aimed at a broad cross-section of the community.


Project grants are available for groups to submit an application to implement road safety projects. These projects can run up to 12 months and should comprise of road safety activities that can be sustained after the funding period. The amount funded is based on the assessment of the application and is judged on individual merit. There are two Project grant rounds per year.




Page last updated: 10 May 2024, 01:56 PM